Tag Archive: retrospective

May 02

Two large US cohort studies have provided retrospective evidence that increasing fiber consumption can increase survival after MI

Two large US cohort studies have provided retrospective evidence that increasing fiber consumption can increase survival after MI. Data review from two large cohort studies revealed that a post–MI increase in fiber intake was associated with a reduced risk of death after age–adjusted analyses.

Feb 26

Primary care physicians may be dropping the ball on getting young adults with hypertension the medication they need to control their blood pressure

Primary care physicians may be dropping the ball on getting young adults with hypertension the medication they need to control their blood pressure, a retrospective study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine showed. The rate of starting antihypertensive medications or achieving blood pressure control without drugs was relatively low across age groups, but it …

Continue reading »

Jan 22

In a retrospective study in JAMA Internal Medicine

In a retrospective study in JAMA Internal Medicine, the presence of a respiratory infection untreated by an antibiotic, as well as exposure to an antibiotic, after accounting for other factors, were both associated with more than twice the likelihood of having an INR reading of 5.0 or higher (ORs 2.46 and 2.12, respectively) in patients …

Continue reading »

Jan 12

According to a retrospective study, when considering patients with acute strokes for endovascular therapy

According to a retrospective study, when considering patients with acute strokes for endovascular therapy, an MRI might help select those who will be most likely to benefit. A protocol that added MRI to the standard CT–based assessment was associated with a lower percentage of patients who underwent endovascular therapy (51.7% versus 96.6%, P

Jan 10

A retrospective study suggested that using equations that incorporate height, weight, age, and sex

A retrospective study suggested that using equations that incorporate height, weight, age, and sex to predict heart mass may better allocate donor hearts to transplant recipients than considering body mass alone. Although differences in body mass were not predictive of survival after heart transplantation, differences in predicted heart mass using those equations were related to …

Continue reading »