Monthly Archive: April 2016

Apr 30

New guideline recommendations for older adults

A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association (AHA), American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is published in the April 2016 issue of the Journal of American College of Cardiology addressing the knowledge gaps in cardiovascular care of the patients aged 75 years or older. The statement recommends to close Knowledge …

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Apr 30

A new score to predict survival post AVR

A single center study reported online in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions says that hemodynamic characterization of any persistent aortic regurgitation with a novel index beats the Aortic Regurgitation Index for predicting survival post TAVR. The score is calculated by measuring the area between the aortic and left ventricular pressure-time curves during diastole, divided by the duration …

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Apr 28

Study reviews long-term post-discharge risks in older MI survivors with/without out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Among older patients with MI who survived to hospital discharge and were not discharged to hospice, those presenting with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) did not have higher 1-year mortality or health care use rates vs those MI survivors without OHCA. These findings published May 2016 in the Journal of American College of Cardiology show that …

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Apr 28

10s ECG may not accurately yield clinically accepted estimation of heart rate in AF

As 10s ECG recording could not provide clinically accepted estimation heart rate, ECG should be recorded at least for 30s in the patients with atrial fibrillation. It is better to record ECG for 60s when the HR is rapid, says a new study published April 19 in International Journal of Cardiology. Study reviews long-term post-discharge …

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Apr 27

recommends skipping sudden cardiac death screening in young athletes

A new review of the literature published in the BMJ says that screening young athletes with physical examination, history taking, and resting ECG to prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD) should be abandoned. Pre-participation screening induces harm because of the high number of false positive results leading to temporary or lifelong disqualification from competitive sports, psychological …

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Apr 27

High intake of sugar-sweetened carbonated beverages associated with increased CAC

A study of more than 22,000 adults in South Korea without a history of cardiovascular disease, cancer, or diabetes showed that those who consumed five or more regular soft drinks per week had a higher prevalence and degree of coronary artery calcium (CAC) (published online April 16, 2016, American Heart Journal)

Apr 26

CKD is a predictor of CV events, death and accelerated CAD progression

In patients with chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and anemia, a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) is an independent predictor of progression to dialysis. In patients with diabetic nephropathy, a history of CAD contributes important prognostic information to traditional risk factors for worsening renal disease (Journal of the American Heart Association, published April 23, 2016).

Apr 26

Predicting Out-of-Office BP in the Clinic

Patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient’s ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive …

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Apr 25

Do not screen for carotids in asymptomatic population

A study published online in JAMA Internal Medicine on April 18 has shown that the vast majority of patients undergoing carotid screening had inappropriate or uncertain indications for such imaging. Only 5% of carotid imaging in asymptomatic patients, those without a history of transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke, was performed for indications agreed to …

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Apr 25

Bystander CPR more important than team CPR

Research has shown higher survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest after bystander interventions and hypothermia. Resuscitation practices that were not significantly associated with survival included simulated training with mock codes, using a dedicated resuscitation team or intraresuscitation monitoring device, patient defibrillation from non–critical-care nursing staff, and immediate debriefings (April 6, 2016 in JAMA Cardiology).

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