Monthly Archive: October 2015

Oct 28

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a buprenorphine buccal film product for the treatment of chronic pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment, for whom alternative treatment options are not sufficient.

Oct 26

A history of bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy does not reduce the odds of death from cardiovascular disease among postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes

A history of bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy does not reduce the odds of death from cardiovascular disease among postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes; however, there may be an association between oophorectomy and CVD in women aged 45 and younger, suggests a new study published online in Diabetes Care.

Oct 26

Low-carb diets are more effective than low-fat diets in weight loss and reducing cardiovascular risk

Low-carb diets are more effective than low-fat diets in weight loss and reducing cardiovascular risk, suggests a new meta-analysis published in PLoS One.

Oct 23

Treatment with the late-sodium-current blocker ranolazine does not improve outcomes in patients with chronic angina and incomplete revascularization after undergoing PCI

Treatment with the late-sodium-current blocker ranolazine does not improve outcomes in patients with chronic angina and incomplete revascularization after undergoing PCI, suggests new research presented at TCT 2015 and simultaneously published in the Lancet.

Oct 21

High cholesterol levels are associated with tendinopathy, reported a review of studies published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine

High cholesterol levels are associated with tendinopathy, reported a review of studies published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Researchers noted that tendinopathy was significantly associated with higher total cholesterol, higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and higher triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein.

Oct 21

A new study suggests that infections in childhood

A new study suggests that infections in childhood, such as such as typhoid fever, measles and chicken pox, are linked to an increased risk of early heart attack. The findings were presented at the Acute Cardiovascular Care conference.

Oct 20

Lowering systolic blood pressure below the currently recommended target can reduce the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)

Lowering systolic blood pressure below the currently recommended target can reduce the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), the most common complication of high blood pressure, suggests new research published in the early online edition of Hypertension.

Oct 19

Pacemakers identify atrial fibrillation and enable initiation of anticoagulation to prevent strokes

Pacemakers identify atrial fibrillation and enable initiation of anticoagulation to prevent strokes, suggests new research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2015.

Oct 17

AHA updates CPR and emergency cardiovascular guidelines

The AHA has released revisions to its “Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC) Guidelines”. These revised guidelines have highlighted the role of the public and 911 dispatchers in reducing time to chest compression in cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital setting. Quick action among bystanders, increased training of emergency personnel, and greater use …

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Oct 15

Patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery were at a much higher risk of self-harm than before the surgery

Patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery were at a much higher risk of self-harm than before the surgery as reported in a longitudinal cohort analysis published in JAMA Surgery.