Monthly Archive: February 2015

Feb 28

Younger women may ignore the earliest symptoms of an impending heart attack

Younger women may ignore the earliest symptoms of an impending heart attack, such as pain and dizziness, and delay seeking emergency medical care, thus contributing to disproportionally high death rates of young women as compared to similarly aged men, suggests a new study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Feb 28

Patients with heart failure commonly struggled with nine activities of daily living (ADL)

Patients with heart failure commonly struggled with nine activities of daily living (ADL), which often worsened over time and were a powerful predictor of all-cause death and hospitalization during a mean follow-up of 3.2 years, suggested a new study published in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Feb 27

Homeless people with mental disease have a more than two-fold risk of developing serious or fatal cardiovascular disease over 30 years than people of the same age and gender with no risk factors for the disease

Homeless people with mental disease have a more than two-fold risk of developing serious or fatal cardiovascular disease over 30 years than people of the same age and gender with no risk factors for the disease, suggests new research published in the journal BMC Public Health.

Feb 27

Episodes of intense anger can trigger a heart attack, especially for those at high risk

Episodes of intense anger can trigger a heart attack, especially for those at high risk, suggests a new study published in the European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care. The study authors reported that the increased risk of heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), lasts for 2 hours following an episode of intense anger.

Feb 26

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that sauna bathing may reduce the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

Feb 26

Patients receiving antithrombotic therapy following an MI who take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)

Patients receiving antithrombotic therapy following an MI who take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) are at an increased risk of bleeding and an increased risk of cardiovascular death, nonfatal recurrent MI, and stroke, suggests a new Danish observational study published in the February 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Feb 25

Nanometer-sized “drones” that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries represent a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized “drones” that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries represent a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, suggests a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Columbia University Medical Center. The findings are published in the online issue of Science …

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Feb 25

Alirocumab shows significantly better LDL-C lowering than ezetimibe

Alirocumab shows significantly better LDL-C lowering than ezetimibe, with a comparable safety profile to ezetimibe, suggests a new phase III study published in Future Cardiology.

Feb 24

Performance of PCI via the transradial route is independently associated with reduced risk ofPerformance of PCI via the transradial route is independently associated with reduced risk of major acute coronary events (MACE), 30–day mortalityPerformance of PCI via the transradial route is independently associated with reduced risk of major acute coronary events (MACE), 30–day mortality

Performance of PCI via the transradial route is independently associated with reduced risk of major acute coronary events (MACE), 30–day mortality, and major bleeding outcomes across all age groups, compared with transfemoral procedures, reported an analysis based on a large cohort of patients in the UK. The results are published in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.

Feb 24

The use of fondaparinux is associated with a lower risk of in-hospital bleeding and mortality in comparison with low–molecular–weight heparin (LMWH)

The use of fondaparinux is associated with a lower risk of in-hospital bleeding and mortality in comparison with low–molecular–weight heparin (LMWH) in patients with non–ST–segment elevation MI (NSTEMI), suggest the results of large Swedish registry published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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