Monthly Archive: December 2014

Dec 31

Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO)

Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have for the first time treated myocardial infarction with telomerase by designing a very innovative strategy – a gene therapy that reactivates the telomerase gene only in the heart, thus increasing survival rates following a heart attack. The report is published in Nature Communications.

Dec 31

Patients undergoing noncardiac surgery in the weeks and months following coronary stent implantation have a significantly increased risk of adverse cardiac events

Patients undergoing noncardiac surgery in the weeks and months following coronary stent implantation have a significantly increased risk of adverse cardiac events, suggests a large retrospective analysis published online in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The risk was greatest if surgery occurred in the first 6 weeks following stent deployment and decreased …

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Dec 30

Rare mutations in a gene called APOA5 increase a person’s risk of having a heart attack early in life and also raise the levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins

Rare mutations in a gene called APOA5 increase a person’s risk of having a heart attack early in life and also raise the levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, suggests a new research published in the journal Nature.

Dec 30

Evaluating how nitrite can improve conditions such as hypertension

Evaluating how nitrite can improve conditions such as hypertension, heart attack and stroke, researchers have suggested that deoxygenated hemoglobin is indeed responsible for triggering the conversion of nitrite to nitric oxide, a process that affects blood flow and clotting. The research is published in a paper online ahead of print in the February issue of …

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Dec 29

Substantially slower progression of subclinical atherosclerosis was seen in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS)

Substantially slower progression of subclinical atherosclerosis was seen in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) who remained on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors compared with those who discontinued them, reported a study published online in Annals of Rheumatic Diseases.

Dec 29

When it comes to heart health, educational attainment, such as college and graduate degrees

When it comes to heart health, educational attainment, such as college and graduate degrees, appears to provide protection for Whites against inflammation – a cardiovascular risk marker- while Blacks may not have any health benefit, suggested a new study by a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health & Society Scholar.

Dec 28

Wild blueberries have beneficial effects on blood pressure and the nutrition-derived inflammatory responses

Wild blueberries have beneficial effects on blood pressure and the nutrition-derived inflammatory responses that are caused by a high-fat diet, suggests a new study published in PLOS ONE.

Dec 28

In a study presented at the 7th Clinical Trials Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease (CTAD)

In a study presented at the 7th Clinical Trials Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease (CTAD), hypertension has been shown to interact with genetic risk to increase the burden of amyloid beta (Aß) in the brain. Study authors noted that in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), individuals with the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 gene, indicating higher AD risk, had …

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Dec 27

A new slant on the “obesity paradox” in patients with heart failure has surfaced in a new analysis from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC)

A new slant on the “obesity paradox” in patients with heart failure has surfaced in a new analysis from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort, in which obesity prior to development of heart failure seemed protective, thus complicating theories about the complex interaction between heart failure and obesity. The study was published online December …

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Dec 27

Patients with mild hypertension (140 to 159 mm Hg/90 to 99 mm Hg) who received antihypertensive therapy lowered their blood pressure

Patients with mild hypertension (140 to 159 mm Hg/90 to 99 mm Hg) who received antihypertensive therapy lowered their blood pressure by about 3.6/2.4 mm Hg and had a reduced short-term risk of dying from stroke or cardiovascular disease, in a large meta-analysis. The review was published online December 22, 2014 in the Annals of …

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