Monthly Archive: October 2014

Oct 31

Men and women react similarly when chest pain strikes, each experiencing uncertainty and denial before reaching a “symptomatic tipping point”

Men and women react similarly when chest pain strikes, each experiencing uncertainty and denial before reaching a “symptomatic tipping point” urging them to seek out medical treatment. Women, however, are more likely than men to delay seeking care when these heart symptoms occur, suggests a new study presented at the 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.

Oct 31

Fasting plasma levels of a metabolite, called trimethylamine–N–oxide (TMAO)

Fasting plasma levels of a metabolite, called trimethylamine–N–oxide (TMAO), generated by intestinal microbes appeared to be significantly higher in a cohort of patients with heart failure than in subjects without heart failure, suggested a new study published in the November 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Oct 30

A new study supports increased platelet activation as a mechanistic link between community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)

A new study supports increased platelet activation as a mechanistic link between community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and MI but raises some doubt on whether aspirin alone would be an effective measure for lowering the MI risk. The study is published in the November 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Oct 30

A population-based study among Ontario patients with chronic CAD found differences in use of laboratory testing and apparent access to physicians in rural vs. urban dwellers

A population-based study among Ontario patients with chronic CAD found differences in use of laboratory testing and apparent access to physicians in rural vs. urban dwellers, yet these did not affect rates of hospitalization or 1-year survival. The study is published online October 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Oct 29

Individuals with a genetic predisposition to high levels of LDL cholesterol are at risk for aortic-valve calcification and aortic stenosis

Individuals with a genetic predisposition to high levels of LDL cholesterol are at risk for aortic-valve calcification and aortic stenosis, revealed a new study presented recently at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress and published concurrently in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Oct 29

Patients with psoriasis have increased odds of suffering from uncontrolled hypertension, with higher risks seen among patients with moderate to severe psoriasis affecting more than 3% of the surface of their bodies

Patients with psoriasis have increased odds of suffering from uncontrolled hypertension, with higher risks seen among patients with moderate to severe psoriasis affecting more than 3% of the surface of their bodies, suggests a population-based, cross-sectional study published online in JAMA Dermatology.

Oct 28

A study recently published in the International Journal of Cardiology has shown that shutting off the blood supply

A study recently published in the International Journal of Cardiology has shown that shutting off the blood supply to an arm or leg before cardiac surgery protects the heart during the operation.

Oct 28

Trans and saturated fat consumption have decreased, but not far enough to meet recommended levels for heart health,

Trans and saturated fat consumption have decreased, but not far enough to meet recommended levels for heart health, and omega-3s have plateaued too low, suggested a population-based study from Wisconsin. The study is published online in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Oct 27

Survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

Survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), suggests a study scheduled to be presented at CHEST 2014, the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians.

Oct 27

A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City has found that heart attacks are not as connected to family history and genetics as may have been previously believed

A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City has found that heart attacks are not as connected to family history and genetics as may have been previously believed. The research stresses that the patients’ lifestyle choices and environment, not just their genetics, may make the difference in …

Continue reading »

Older posts «